Reporter. Producer. Photographer.

     Freelance journalist based in Mexico City.

Endless commutes and shakedowns at Mexico's southern border

Endless commutes and shakedowns at Mexico’s southern border

The flood of young Central American migrants streaming across the US border over the past year has slowed to a trickle. One of the reasons may be Mexico’s increased border enforcement along its southern border with Guatemala. And that’s creating headaches for Mexicans living near that border. Read more.
A journey of 4,000 miles with an uncertain end

A journey of 4,000 miles with an uncertain end

Traveling with a coyote: Brothers journey 4,000 miles to reunite with undocumented parents in US. Read more.
When visiting your parents involves unspeakable dangers

When visiting your parents involves unspeakable dangers

Why would any parent send their kids on a deadly trip to cross the Mexico-US border? Here’s why. 
Latest entries
Soccer ball promises renewable energy... but doesn't always deliver

Soccer ball promises renewable energy… but doesn’t always deliver

The Soccket starts with a soccer ball. Kick the ball around and a contraption inside harnesses the kinetic energy of those kicks. The ball then stores that energy and can be used to power a lamp. One of the first large-scale distributions took place in March 2013 in the Mexican state of Puebla. Mexico’s biggest TV...
Mexico needs OBEY clothing and good California wines ... And Californians are here to make it happen

Mexico needs OBEY clothing and good California wines … And Californians are here to make it happen

Anjo Nava lives in Mexico City and fell in love with Los Angeles on a recent trip.  To remember his time in Southern California, he brought back an Obey Giant bandana, known for its stylized mug shot of pro-wrestler Andre the Giant and the word Obey.  The bandanas are the work of L.A. street artist...
How to fight obesity and still fill your plate

How to fight obesity and still fill your plate

  Round Earth Media and Daniel Hernandez dived into Mexico. I got to tag along to a food fair and interview people on the street. Listen here. 
A loss of country...

A loss of country…

Freezing rooms, overcrowded cells and two meals a day, deportation strikes thousands of people in the U.S. every year. For Latino USA’s Dearly Deported series, here’s the story of Eduardo Arenas’ from Mexico City. Arenas tells of the meager food and harsh conditions of detention and what it’s like to have his family still in the...
A tiny coffee shop in a big city

A tiny coffee shop in a big city

Mexico City is home to around 20 million people. Right in the middle of town,  a tiny third wave coffee shop is doing swift business and looking to open up more shops. How to succeed in business… in Mexico. Listen here.
Two storms pummel Mexico

Two storms pummel Mexico

  The rains just won’t stop in Mexico this week. Today, the Mexican government said that 58 people are missing and presumed dead in a landslide that followed a deluge in the country’s southern mountains. They’re just the latest casualties in what the Mexican government is calling an historic one-two punch of tropical storms hitting...
Obama talks oil with Mexican president

Obama talks oil with Mexican president

President Barack Obama is in Mexico today, meeting with that country’s leader Enrique Peña Nieto. They’ll be talking immigration, border security and trade. But analysts say their conversation will likely turn to one touchy topic: Oil and gas reserves in Mexico. Twenty years after the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico’s oil reserves have remained...
Mexico's Peña Nieto faces challenges, protests

Mexico’s Peña Nieto faces challenges, protests

Mexico has a new president. Enrique Peña Nieto announced major economic initiatives as he was inaugurated over the weekend. On the inside of the festivities, Peña Nieto’s first day on the job was all cheers. Outside, rioters opposed to Peña Nieto and his PRI party charged official barriers and threw Molotov cocktails. Police fired rubber...
What US marijuana policy could mean for Mexico's drug war

What US marijuana policy could mean for Mexico’s drug war

In a few days, Enrique Peña Nieto will move into the presidential palace and his security policy will become the law of the land — including the war on drugs.   That’s led to deadly clashes between cartels and Mexican security forces. “It’s a war,” says Jorge Javier Romero, a professor of political science at Mexico’s...
They call him "Frosted Flakes"

They call him “Frosted Flakes”

That, according to a new piece by Associated Press writer Mark Stevenson, is one narco nickname. OK, yeah… it doesn’t really seem that scary. There are plenty of very creepy nicknames out there. But some have taken a bit of an ironic tone. The new breed of nicknames show “a trace of cynicism, of mockery,”...
How to get a job in Mexico's public schools

How to get a job in Mexico’s public schools

It’ll cost you. Getting a job in Mexico’s basic education system comes with plenty of perks: Many career teachers get housing credits, generous pensions, long summer vacations and year end bonuses. But to get one of those jobs, experts say, they often have to grease the palms of their superiors. Many in Mexico look to...
The mysteries of mezcal

The mysteries of mezcal

Mezcal is a magical tequila-like liquor. While in the Oaxacan town of Mitla, we got a glimpse (and a taste) of the manufacturing process when we toured a mezcalería. Mezcal makers typically bury the heart of a mature agave plant in hot rocks and smoke it for several days. After distilling, the liquid is often...